Ladislav Sutnar: Build the Town building block set (1943)

"Factory Town" toy prototype, c 1942 by Ladislav Sutnar

21/02/11 – Ladislav Sutnar began designing toys while a student at the School of Applied Arts in Prague in the early 1920s. His use of simple geometric shapes and bright colours resonated with children as well as adults. His designs, though rooted in the rich heritage of Czechoslovak folk art, helped bring toy design into the 20th century.

His toys depicted modern everyday objects (cars, trains, factories) and were carefully designed to allow for mass automated or conveyor-belt production. As early as 1921, Sutnar’s toys began gaining wide acclaim, winning numerous awards and touring in international shows.

During the early 1920s he began work on a building block set called Modular City (Skládací město) for the Artěl Association. The design would win him a prize at the Toys exhibition held by the Prague Museum of Applied Arts in 1924. Between 1926 and 1929, he further developed his ideas and created more prototypes, including a building block set entitled Factory Town (Tovární město) this time winning significant recognition both in Czechoslovakia and abroad.

Through the 1930s, Sutnar looked beyond toy design and held positions in several notable applied arts and cultural organizations. He also worked on a great number of collaborative and solo projects ranging from book design and typography, to industrial and exhibition design. It was not until the early 1940s that he would once again return to his building block designs.

After traveling to the United States to help setup the Czechoslovak pavilion for the 1939 New York World’s Fair and subsequently being stranded due to the outbreak of war, he developed what would be the final iteration of his building block designs. He called it Build the Town. In an effort to see the set produced, he created designs for packaging, instructions and promotional artwork and, after unsuccessfully securing a manufacturer, himself commissioned the production of fifty sets.

Prototypes of Build the Town, as well as promotional material and working sketches, now reside in the collections of several major museums including the Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum, MOMA and the National Museum of Decorative Arts in Prague.

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Modular City building block set (1922)

Building block set, 1927

Building block set, 1927

Prototype, Tovarni mesto (Factory Town) bulding block set, 1927

Factory Town building block set 1927

Kit sketches, Build the Town building block set, 1942-3

Kit sketches, Build the Town building block set, 1942-3

Kit sketches, Build the Town building block set, 1942-3

Kit sketches, Build the Town building block set, 1942-3

Documentation, blocks and roofs, Build the Town building block set, ca. 1943

Documentation: roofs, Build the Town building block set, ca. 1943

Documentation, blocks and roofs, Build the Town building block set, ca. 1943

Documentation: blocks, Build the Town building block set, ca. 1943

Promotion kits, Build the Town building block set, ca. 1943

Promotion kits, Build the Town building block set, ca. 1943

Promotion kits, Build the Town building block set, ca. 1943

Promotion kits, Build the Town building block set, ca. 1943

Design of box, Build the Town building block set, ca. 1943

Design of box, Build the Town building block set, ca. 1943

Designs of box, Build the Town building block set, ca. 1943

Design of box, Build the Town building block set, ca. 1943

Designs of box, Build the Town building block set, ca. 1943

Design of box, Build the Town building block set, ca. 1943

Prototype, Build the Town building block set, 1943

Prototype, Build the Town building block set, 1943

Sutnar - Build the Town Source: MOMA

Prototype for Build the Town Building Blocks, 1940-43

Sources and more information

2 Responses to “Ladislav Sutnar: Build the Town building block set (1943)”

  1. vitopacquee says:

    [...] http://www.olivertomas.com/industrial-design/ladislav-sutnar-build-the-town-building-block-set-1943/ Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:LikeBe the first to like this post. ← Previous post [...]

  2. [...] to find out more about Sutnar’s work there’s a very useful page from design historian Oliver Tomas’s site and flickr stream on these fabulous toy sets from [...]

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Oliver Tomas

  • Design historian and archivist based in Vancouver, Canada.
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